The Skyscraper Museum
The Skyscraper Museum


Located in New York City, the world's first and foremost vertical metropolis, The Skyscraper Museum celebrates the City's rich architectural heritage and examines the historical forces and individuals that have shaped its successive skylines. Through exhibitions, programs and publications, the Museum explores tall buildings as objects of design, products of technology, sites of construction, investments in real estate, and places of work and residence. For a description of the gallery and for photos of the space, please visit our Photo Slideshows page.

The Skyscraper Museum is located in lower Manhattan's Battery Park City at 39 Battery Place. Museum hours are 12-6 PM, Wednesday-Sunday.

General admission is $5, $2.50 for students and seniors. Click here for directions to the Museum. All galleries and facilities are wheelchair accessible.
CURRENT EXHIBITION

TEN & TALLER, 1874-1900
Through April 2017



TEN & TALLER focuses on New York’s earliest “skyscrapers,” surveying every building in Manhattan of ten or more stories – 250 in all – from the all-masonry “skyscrapers” of the mid-1870s to the standardized steel skeletons at the turn of the twentieth century. The exhibition maps and graphs their location, uses, and heights, tracing an urban development of the city’s commercial expansion and vertical rise.




UPCOMING PROGRAMS

Wednesday, February 22, 2016 3:00 pm

Curator's Tour

Director and curator Carol Willis will lead a curator's tour of the museum's new exhibition TEN & TALLER. Curators tours are free with admission. No RSVP required.




Wednesday, March 8, 2017 6:30-8:00 pm

Thomas Leslie Book Talk

Chicago Skyscrapers, 1871-1934

University of Illinois Press, 2013

This history of Chicago's skyscrapers begins in the key period of reconstruction after the Great Fire of 1871 and ends a chapter in 1934 amid the Great Depression that brought construction to a standstill. Thomas Leslie covers these years in his book ​Chicago Skyscrapers , detailing building methods, foundation materials, framing structures, and electric lighting, and other technical innovations. Leslie also considers how the city's infamous political climate contributed to its architecture, as building and zoning codes were often disputed by shifting networks of rivals, labor unions, professional organizations, and municipal bodies.

Thomas Leslie is the Morrill Pickard Chilton Professor in Architecture at Iowa State University, where he researches the integration of building sciences and arts both historically and in contemporary practice. He is the author of​​ Louis I. Kahn: Building Art​​, Building Science (2005) and, with Jason Alread and Robert Whitehead, Design-Tech: Building Science for Architects (2014). A winner of the 2013 Booth Family Rome Prize in Historic Preservation and Conservation at the American Academy in Rome, he is at work on a study of the buildings of the Italian engineer and architect Pier Luigi Nervi.

Reservations are required, and priority is given to Members and Corporate Member firms and their employees. All guests MUST RSVP to programs@skyscraper.org to assure admittance to the event. Not a member? Become a Museum member today!




Thursday & Friday, March 9 & 10, 2017

TEN & TALLER Symposium
The Rise of the Skyscraper City: ​
All the Tall Buildings in Manhattan, 1874-1900

In conjunction with its current exhibition ​​TEN & TALLER, 1874-1900, The Skyscraper Museum presents symposium that explores new narratives of the first decades of high-rise history. Organized into four sessions, on Thursday evening, March 9 and on Friday morning and afternoon, March 10, the symposium brings together a range of scholars and authors who have studied nineteenth-century New York from the perspectives of architecture, engineering, and urban history.

Reservations are required, and priority is given to Members and Corporate Member firms and their employees. All guests MUST RSVP to programs@skyscraper.org to assure admittance to the event. Not a member? Become a Museum member today!

Sessions 1 and 2 will be held at The Skyscraper Museum, 39 Battery Place
Sessions 3 and 4 will be held at the Cornell AAP facility at 26 Broadway

Click here for further symposium details.



Click here for more upcoming programs.




UPCOMING FAMILY PROGRAMS

NEW YORK’S TALLEST THROUGH HISTORY
February 25
10:30- 11:45
A scavenger hunt in the Museum’s galleries will track the tallest buildings in New York City and in the world from 1870 to 1979 to 2017! Then kids will compare the scale of buildings that have held the title of tallest by constructing paper models of the World Building, the Empire State Building, and One World Trade Center. Learn a bout the evolution from small to TALL! Ages 6+.

Click here for more upcoming Family Programs



Click here to read Director Carol Willis's 2016 Director's Report.



A 3-D CBD: How the 1916 Zoning Law
Shaped Manhattan's Central Business Districts


skyscrapers, One57, 111 West 57th Street, 432 Park Avenue, 520 Park Avenue, Central Park Tower, 220 Central Park South, 53W53rd, 100 E 53rd Street, Sky House, 45 E 22nd Street, One Madison, 35 Hudson Yards, 56 Leonard, 30 Park Place, 111 Murray Street, 125 Greenwich Street, 50 West Street, 9 DeKalb, new york architecture, nyc skyscrapers, luxury residential, residential skyscraper, new york's super-slenders, slender skyscrapers

1939-40 NYC Department of Finance tax lot photographs of the Garment District, showing the distinctive setbacks created by the 1916 zoning law. From left to right: 345-351 W. 35th Street; 347-351 W. 36th Street; 247-255 W. 38th Street.



This essay, published online on July 25, 2016, to mark the precise centennial of the passage of the New York City Zoning Resolution on July 25th, 1916, is a revised and updated version of a 1991 conference paper and subsequent chapter of a 1993 book, Planning and Zoning New York City: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow. Organized by the New York City Department of City Planning, the conference celebrated the 75th anniversary of the zoning law with a symposium on the history and future of planning in New York City. Read the final report here

Click here to read the essay



skyscrapers, One57, 111 West 57th Street, 432 Park Avenue, 520 Park Avenue, Central Park Tower, 220 Central Park South, 53W53rd, 100 E 53rd Street, Sky House, 45 E 22nd Street, One Madison, 35 Hudson Yards, 56 Leonard, 30 Park Place, 111 Murray Street, 125 Greenwich Street, 50 West Street, 9 DeKalb, new york architecture, nyc skyscrapers, luxury residential, residential skyscraper, new york's super-slenders, slender skyscrapers

​The Skyscraper Museum has created a new web project that explains an emerging form in skyscraper history that has evolved in New York over the past decade:  the super-slender, ultra luxury residential tower. These pencil-thin periscopes — all 50 to 90+ stories — use a development and design strategy of slenderness to pile their city-regulated maximum square feet of floor area (FAR) as high in the sky to as possible to create luxury apartments defined by spectacular views.

Click here to view NEW YORK'S SUPER-SLENDERS




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The Museum is a participating member of the Downtown Culture Pass.